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The Highway of DespairCritical Theory After Hegel$
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Robyn Marasco

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231168663

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231168663.001.0001

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Concluding Postscript

Concluding Postscript

Chapter:
(p.169) Concluding Postscript
Source:
The Highway of Despair
Author(s):

Robyn Marasco

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231168663.003.0007

This concluding chapter discusses Habermas' critique of the Hegelian viewpoint concerning faith and reason. In the attempt to repair the breach between the two, Hegelian philosophy demands rational reflection on religion's truth-content. Christianity, for Hegel, represents the unity in difference of the finite and the infinite, the particular and the universal, the human and the divine. The basic problem with Hegel's reconciliation of knowledge and faith, as Habermas viewed it, is that this system presumes what it needs to demonstrate, namely, “that a kind of reason which is more than an absolutized understanding can convincingly reunify the antithesis that reason has to unfold discursively.” Hegelian reason assumes the historical achievement that it purports to reveal. It is thereby cut off from historical reality, temporal contingencies, and the procedures of critical reflection.

Keywords:   Faith, reason, knowledge, Hegelian philosophy, Jürgen Habermas, historical reality, temporal contingencies

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