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Race UnmaskedBiology and Race in the Twentieth Century$
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Michael Yudell

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231168748

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231168748.001.0001

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Race and the Evolutionary Synthesis

Race and the Evolutionary Synthesis

Chapter:
(p.111) 7 Race and the Evolutionary Synthesis
Source:
Race Unmasked
Author(s):

Michael Yudell

J. Craig Venter

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231168748.003.0008

The combination of experimental genetics, theoretical population genetics, and natural history produces an evolutionary synthesis in biology. This chapter shows how this synthesis resolved various issues for biology; for instance, affirming that natural selection was the mechanism responsible for evolutionary change. Ernst Mayr, one of the proponents of the evolutionary synthesis, thought that prior to the synthesis geneticists were stuck in a mentality in which species and populations are seen as uniform types rather than highly variable collections of genetically unique individuals. The chapter also tackles the different modern interpretations of the race concept, such as Theodosius Dobzhansky's and L. C. Dunn's efforts to create a new race concept without racism, and Ashley Montagu's rejection of both the typological and genetical approach to race.

Keywords:   evolutionary synthesis, natural selection, Ernst Mayr, race concept, Theodosius Dobzhansky, L. C. Dunn, Ashley Montagu

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