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Dangerous TradeArms Exports, Human Rights, and International Reputation$
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Jennifer Erickson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231170963

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231170963.001.0001

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History and Contemporary Trends in Conventional Arms Export Controls

History and Contemporary Trends in Conventional Arms Export Controls

Chapter:
(p.44) 3. History and Contemporary Trends in Conventional Arms Export Controls
Source:
Dangerous Trade
Author(s):

Jennifer L. Erickson

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231170963.003.0003

This chapter charts the key events in the twentieth-century global arms trade; during the post-World War I and interwar years, the Cold War, and the early 1990s and beyond. During the post-World War I, these successive initiatives—St. Germain Convention (1919), Geneva Arms Traffic Convention (1925), and Disarmament Conference (1934)—in controlling the arms trade failed due to the impossibility of aligning the material interests and security priorities of major arms-producing states. These conflicts of interest were exacerbated by the East-West ideological orientation, of the United States and the Soviet Union, at the turn of the Cold War period. The Cold War's end, however, meant significant changes in supplier-recipient relationships, as well as the justification for and efforts to arms trade control. The 1990s saw the momentum that spurred the passage of the Arms Trade Treaty, a legally binding agreement between states for regulating international arms trade.

Keywords:   twentieth-century, global arms trade, post-World War I, Cold War, St. Germain Convention, Geneva Arms Traffic Convention, Disarmament Conference, United States, Soviet Union

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