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Govern Like UsU.S. Expectations of Poor Countries$
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M. A. Thomas

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231171205

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231171205.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

The Governance Ideal

The Governance Ideal

Chapter:
(p.21) 2. The Governance Ideal
Source:
Govern Like Us
Author(s):

M. A. Thomas

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231171205.003.0002

This chapter explores the Western governance agenda and how the emergence of the current conception of governance in a handful of countries in the mid-twentieth century was concomitant with and dependent on increased government revenue. Notably, there is a visible correlation between increased revenue and the growth of the public sector, as increased revenue can provide the resources needed to effect certain laws and statutes, as well as to provide public goods and services. Poor governments are at a handicap due to their limited resources, and are often forced to engage in practices that are considered illegal in other countries because they cannot afford better alternatives. Thus, they should not be expected to address issues in the same manner as rich liberal democracies, and held against a moral standard defined by the latter.

Keywords:   Western governance, government revenue, limited resources, public sector, moral standard

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