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The Lumière GalaxySeven Key Words for the Cinema to Come$
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Francesco Casetti

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231172431

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231172431.001.0001

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Hypertopia

Hypertopia

Chapter:
(p.129) 5. Hypertopia
Source:
The Lumière Galaxy
Author(s):

Francesco Casetti

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231172431.003.0006

This chapter explores the notion of hypertopia within the context of cinematic relocation. In this context, the notion of hypertopia refers to the capacity of new places of cinematic vision (e.g. living rooms or home theaters) to bring in the cinematic presence that is originally felt within darkened traditional movie theaters. This cinematic presence can be characterized as ambiguous, divisible, and resonating. Firstly, cinematic presence is ambiguous if it is difficult to decrypt and can be deeply questioned, as this does not constitute a nostalgic evocation of a lost context. Secondly, cinematic presence is divisible in terms of the screen size: small screens enable spectators to master what they have in front of their eyes, while mega-screens overwhelm the spectators. Lastly, cinematic presence is often resonating, as the domestic environment can preserve a memory of what the cinema was and it can continue.

Keywords:   hypertopia, cinematic vision, home theaters, cinematic presence, ambiguous cinematic presence, divisible cinematic presence, resonating cinematic presence, domestic environment, cinema

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