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Sight UnseenGender and Race Through Blind Eyes$
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Ellyn Kaschak

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231172905

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231172905.001.0001

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Blind Citizenship Classes

Blind Citizenship Classes

The Mirror Does Not Reflect

Chapter:
(p.155) 10 Blind Citizenship Classes
Source:
Sight Unseen
Author(s):

Ellyn Kaschak

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231172905.003.0010

This chapter discusses the eye/brain combination in recognizing arbitrary visual cues holistically, and how the blind, in attempting to imitate these cues, often come across as histrionic to the sighted. In a formal setting such as a school—even a school for the blind—even verbal cues and languages cannot account for the visual “blind spots” that inform the practices of distinction and discrimination. Without sight, the performance is fragmented and reduced, just as it is carefully memorized and not well embedded in the bodies of the blind. In their very effort to participate in gender and racialization, the blind imitate and expose it as unnatural.

Keywords:   eye/brain combination, visual cues, school for the blind, verbal cues, languages, blind spots, distinction, discrimination, gender, racialization

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